Can these lightbulbs regulate our body’s internal clocks?

Quick notes:

  • New lightbulb technology is promoting healthier light and darkness levels within our homes and offices to aid our body’s natural rhythm

  • Light-related circadian rhythm can be found in almost all living things

  • Lightbulbs can help boost our energy levels or help us drift off to sleep easier

It’s no secret that sunlight is great for our mental and physical well-being. It also probably isn’t a surprise that we feel sleepier at night and in the darkness. If you’ve ever wondered how this is possible, it’s all due to our body’s natural clock, known as the circadian rhythm.

New lightbulb technology is promoting healthier light and darkness levels within our homes and offices to aid our body’s natural rhythm. These lightbulbs can help boost our energy levels or help us drift off to sleep easier.

Here’s everything you need to know about these handy bulbs and their effects on our circadian rhythm.

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What is the circadian rhythm?

Circadian rhythms are best described as the mental, physical, and behavioral changes that coincide with a daily cycle. This daily cycle is signified by light and darkness. Our bodies respond to the changes in the environment by producing or suppressing melatonin production.

Essentially, this is the science behind why we are awake during the day and asleep at night. This light-related circadian rhythm can be found in almost all living things. From animals to plants and even tiny microbes, we can see how the daily cycle of light effects behaviors.

Our bodies need to have light

Sunlight powers our bodies, the earth, plants, and almost every living organism. We need light to keep our mental and physical states functioning properly. Light helps give us energy and signifies to our body that its time to wake up and start the day.

In many places on earth, the winter months can be especially dreary since there are fewer hours of sunlight and more time spent awake in the dark. Shorter days combined with dark office environments can really take their toll on our mental health and moods.

There are lightbulbs that can provide a white-color, designed with the sun’s natural light spectrum in mind. These lightbulbs aim to provide an alternative to the typical indoor lights that can cause drowsiness or headaches. Think of the horrible fluorescent lighting found in most office environments and how they make your head and eyes feel.

Darkness can help aid sleep

In the same way that we need natural light to function, we also need darkness to sleep. Darkness helps our body know that it’s time to start producing melatonin. Melatonin is slowly released by our body naturally, as we near the evening hours.

If you understand the idea behind room darkening shades you can understand how the darker your room is at night, the more peacefully you will drift off to sleep and stay asleep. With babies and small children, for example, it’s often suggested to use room marketing shades during nap and bedtimes to help signal to their body that it’s time to sleep.

Lightbulbs can also help your body know that it’s time for rest. Lightbulbs that emit a soft, white-color light that mimics the wavelengths of light found in the evenings are ideal. Much like twilight does in the environment, these lights can help your body relax and fall asleep quicker.

Negative effects of light on sleep patterns

Using your cell phone or computer in bed is one of the worst ways to fall asleep. The blue light from your screen is disruptive. Avoid using your phone directly before bed by putting a little buffer between screen time and sleep time if you can.

After you scroll through your phone for a bit, put it down, do some stretches in the dim light or read a book to relax. The same goes for falling asleep with the television on.

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